Sandbox (4)

Sometimes very active discussions about peripheral issues overwhelm a thread, so this is a permanent home for those conversations.

I’ve opened a new “Sandbox” thread as a post as the new “ignore commenter” plug-in only works on threads started as posts.

1,555 thoughts on “Sandbox (4)

  1. J-Mac: It’s clear that the ignore button works better than 3 biased moderators…

    You should learn how to use it then!

  2. stcordova,

    Yes, Wiener is quite interesting. Though he’s not generally regarded as a philosopher by professional philosophers, his contributions to cybernetics (including coining the term!) are substantial. A few days ago I finished reading On the Origins of Cognitive Science by Jean-Pierre Dupuy. It’s a fascinating and detailed intellectual history of the early cybernetics movement and has lots of detail about McCulloch, Pitts, von Neumann, Wiener, and Turing.

    From there I was led to discover the British cyberneticists (esp Ross Ashby and Grey Walter) who had a major impact on second-order cybernetics with Heinz von Foerster, Humberto Maturana, Francisco Varela, and Niklas Luhmann. I have been an avid reader of Maturana and Varela for a long time but I didn’t realize until today how much they were grounded in second-order cybernetics. And I also learned today how much second-order cybernetics emerged in response to Ross Ashby’s challenge to McCulloch at one of the later Macy conferences.

    Not only that but cybernetics also influenced Gregory Bateson, R. D. Laing, and even Brian Eno, Brian Gysin, and William S. Burroughs!

    Fascinating stuff!

  3. I went cycling in my neck of the woods…beautiful conservation areas…I noticed that in some cultures men and women sit in separate circles, eat and drink separately…even walk…

    One thing they can’t avoid doing separately though… jiggy jiggy🤣

  4. Kantian Naturalist:
    stcordova,

    Yes, Wiener is quite interesting. Though he’s not generally regarded as a philosopher by professional philosophers, his contributions to cybernetics (including coining the term!) are substantial. A few days ago I finished reading On the Origins of Cognitive Science by Jean-Pierre Dupuy. It’s a fascinating and detailed intellectual history of the early cybernetics movement and has lots of detail about McCulloch, Pitts, von Neumann, Wiener, and Turing.

    From there I was led to discover the British cyberneticists (esp Ross Ashby and Grey Walter) who had a major impact on second-order cybernetics with Heinz von Foerster, Humberto Maturana, Francisco Varela, and Niklas Luhmann. I have been an avid reader of Maturana and Varela for a long time but I didn’t realize until today how much they were grounded in second-order cybernetics. And I also learned today how much second-order cybernetics emerged in response to Ross Ashby’s challenge to McCulloch at one of the later Macy conferences.

    Not only that but cybernetics also influenced Gregory Bateson, R. D. Laing, and even Brian Eno, Brian Gysin, and William S. Burroughs!

    Fascinating stuff!

    Thank you very much for the informative reply.

  5. Most of the Quantum Mechanics stuff I studied was plain vanilla stuff for chemistry and lasers, however my Graduate Advisor at the time Bryan Jacobs, was pioneer of quantum computing. Some of my classmates studied the topic. I just was never able to get it schedule as it conflicted with other classes.

    Anyway, This article was interesting:

    https://www.sciencealert.com/are-we-all-quantum-computers-with-quantum-brains

    Other experiments will look at the potential for decoherence, which happens when the links and dependency between qubits – the idea of quantum entanglement – start to break down. For our brains to be quantum computers, there must be a built-in way that our biological qubits are shielded from decoherence.

    Yet another experiment is going to investigate mitochondria, the cell subunits responsible for our metabolism and sending messages around the body. It’s possible that these organelles also play a significant role in qubit entanglement.

    In other words, the neurotransmitters and synaptic firing in our brains could be creating quantum coupled networks, just like a quantum computer. Fisher and his team will attempt to emulate this in the lab.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.