Sandbox (4)

Sometimes very active discussions about peripheral issues overwhelm a thread, so this is a permanent home for those conversations.

I’ve opened a new “Sandbox” thread as a post as the new “ignore commenter” plug-in only works on threads started as posts.

561 thoughts on “Sandbox (4)

  1. dazz: …climate change could be exacerbating the problem…

    No question. What worries me is that we’re past the point where there is any doubt about it and also past the point where we can do enough to limit it.

  2. Alan Fox:
    A worryingprediction of the consequences of climate change…

    Less beer

    Oh dear… pretty sure shortage of beer is one of the 10 plagues of the bible. This is it, we’re doomed. But in all seriousness, this is fucked up. Hope it’s not too late

  3. Alan Fox: What worries me is that we’re past the point where there is any doubt about it and also past the point where we can do enough to limit it.

    It will have to get far, far worse before the USA Republican party will take it seriously.

  4. Alan Fox:
    A worryingprediction of the consequences of climate change…

    Less beer

    But warmer temperatures means more arable land available in Canada for cannabis, hence more supply, hence cheaper prices. If I weigh beer against cannabis, I’ve got to go with the cheaper cannabis.

    Especially since beer has so many more calories.

  5. In Wake Of Terrifying Climate Report, German Environmentalists Will, In A Twist, Rally For Nuclear

    “Had Germany spent that $580 billion on nuclear instead of renewables and the fossil plant upgrades and grid expansions they require, it could have replaced all of the fossil fuels it uses for both electricity and transportation.”

    https://twitter.com/EnergyJvd/status/1052094666055802881

  6. petrushka,

    Yes, I’ve never understood the visceral antipathy of some to nuclear energy. Flying commercially has become very safe because it is highly regulated, planes and other infrastructure regularly inspected and maintained.

    With similar levels of safety standards and implementation, what’s the downside to nuclear energy?
    And there are alternatives to uranium.

  7. There are several viable designs for “throwaway” thorium reactors that cannot melt down. They seem like a no brainer for places where wind and solar are not feasible, and they seem like a useful adjunct for places that use solar.

    I have no use for virtue signalling. Politicians have proven useless at solving this kind of problem, because it requires thinking decades ahead, and elections come up every couple of years.

    In the near term — the next hundred years — we will just have to live with climate change. But within 20 or thirty years, carbon based energy will become more expensive than alternatives, and politicians can fight over regulations, which is all they are good for.

  8. petrushka,

    Now some of the mud has settled where I live, the real cost of climate change is being counted. Yesterday I drove through the next town to where I live. It’s built around a water course that doesn’t dry up in summer. The banks used to be covered with potagers (vegetable gardens) benefiting from the available water, houses backing on to the stream had gardens tiered down to the water’s edge.

    Idyllic!

    Until Sunday night and Monday morning.

    Unprecedented torrential rain falling in the stream’s catchment area resulted in a wall of water, mud and debris hitting the town and the bottleneck of the bridge. The devastation is appalling. An estimated 400 people (just from this town) are having to be rehoused. The damage to property is enormous. The damage to people’s confidence in the future is worse. How can these people restore and move back to their homes without worrying whether another unprecedented storm will flood them from their homes again?

    I guess it must be the same problem for people living in Florida.

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